minim house | foundry architects

pull out floor bed with full mattress (no loft to crawl up, cooler in the summer, simple bed-making).

no walls to diminish sense of space. (210 ft2) for full 1-2 person living and entertaining: a 10′ kitchen, a 5′ closet, 8′ sofa/guest bed, dedicated office area, 4′ dining table, comfortable seating for 7, and a 7′ projection screen.

streamlined framing and insulation with standardized SIPs panels (shipped nationwide). Just 3 windows and 1 door to install; no window/door trim work on exterior or interior.

innovative table system that may be raised/lowered/swiveled in 4 floor sockets to function as kitchen island/bar, second desk, coffee table, dining table, and bedside table.

detachable design (house may be undocked from trailer with 15 bolts).

off-grid design for areas without water/sewer/electric hookups.

integrated rain catchment/storage with no visible gutters.

minim micro homes | plans | more boneyard

(via smallandtinyhomeideas)

The upcoming tiny house documentary film Small is Beautiful has proclaimed itself to be “not about tiny house porn"…
     …but apparently there is some serious book porn in their promo video for these indie notebooks. The process short-film is repleat with sultry syncopation by a 60 year old letter press, an offset print press and other cool vintage industrial items which form a backdrop for the warm smiles of independent artist Melissa Rachel Black and master publisher Ellery Harvey of Scout Books as they wax passionate about their processes.
So, if you like process short-films you may dig it.

via Ryan Panos

First Modular Apartment Building in NYC Opens | Gluck+ | ADDoA

THE STACK addresses the need for moderate-income housing in Manhattan.  It finds opportunity on a small, difficult urban site through the alternative method of offsite construction.  Offsite construction offers an accelerated schedule and shorter financing period, turning sites that might otherwise be considered risky and turning them into opportunities.  It is a pilot project for developing a quality and economically viable housing solution to strategically rebuilding and filling gaps in outmoded housing infrastructure in the city.

Although not necessary to its construction methodology, the design of this 7-storey residential building expresses its offsite modular construction.  Each individual unit is legible but also reads as part of a knit-together whole.  Inside, different combinations of units provide structural integrity, as well as a diverse selection in the kinds of layouts for tenants.

related post via MiniMotives

America’s first official “Tiny House Friendly” Town

Jul. 20, 2014 - SPUR, Texas

The City Council of Spur, TX passed a resolution tonight designating the City of Spur as America’s first officially “Tiny House Friendly” town. The resolution tips its hat to the movement toward smaller and more efficient dwellings that has grown into a national trend dubbed the “Tiny House Movement” by proponents and the press.

Motivated by downward pressure on wages and real estate prices and an abhorrence of waste, a new generation of pioneers is setting about re-inventing the American dream, harking back to the pioneer spirit of early settlers who carved lives out of the wilderness with a determined focus on self-sufficiency and modest living. But this is not your great grandfathers’ tiny house. Aided by technology and innovative designs from companies like Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, the new pioneer house would make Thoreau blush at its luxurious accommodations.

 “We saw that larger cities haven’t been all that welcoming to smaller houses, seemingly unable to remove permitting and code obstacles, (usually requiring square footage to be 1,000 sq./ft. or more), so we hoped we could help by removing restrictions related to home size.” Adams says, “Folks who want to live the “Tiny” house life in Spur need only to build with quality, connect to city utilities and pay taxes like everybody else.”

More information about the Spur “Tiny” house initiative can be found at www.spurfreedom.com | hat tip to Tiny House Build

The best way to use tiny houses in a city is [in my opinion] is as a series of infill homes, aka increasing densities by adding another structure to an existing home lot. Similar to the example being set in parts of Portland. To increase density, not decrease homelessness. To decrease homelessness is a noble cause and should be sought but I am leery of those wanting to use a tiny house model as a solution,…

To address homeless housing I believe the solution is building up (vertical), not out. We currently do this with many examples across the country such as the apartment building model. The shared walls are a cost savings. Not only that, you can take a one acre lot zoned R-40 lets say, on that lot you could legally park 40 tiny houses but logistically maybe only 25-30 could fit. You can take that same lot and feasibly build ten two-story fourplexes capitalizing on the entire lot and provide MORE housing than tiny houses would allow. My bet is it would be much more cost effective too to provide those ten fourplexes than 25 tiny houses. You are doing more with less money an providing a solution to more people, it’s far more efficient.

Macy Miller of MiniMotives

The Zachary House | Stephen Atkinson

In Ramseur, North Carolina, a reincarnation of a modernist dog-trot house. The original was designed by Stephen Atkinson more than a decade ago and became a darling of design magazines. This one was built by Terrie Moffitt and Avshalom Caspi, psychology professors at Duke University, who saw the house on the cover of a book, and wrote to Mr. Atkinson. He made a bargain with them: they could have the plans free, but if they made substantial changes, he would charge them.

via The New York Times | hat tip sustainablesmallhouses

“Throughout the film, [people] in the tiny house movement share a peek into their design-savvy homes and also discuss an array of reasons for their lifestyle, from the environmental to the economic.”
— Review of TINY // UTNE Reader

"Yesterday I got to put in a window, and that was a big accomplishment," said Julia Branscombe, 11, a rising sixth-grader at the Key School. She had to hunch down atop scaffolding to nail it in, she said.

The students have received a help and instruction from a team of community volunteers. Rogers Belch, lead carpenter, has years of experience building homes with Habitat for Humanity. He said he’s “constantly thinking of how to make [the project] meaningful for the kids,” often stopping to explain the construction process and encouraging them to take leadership roles.

via The Baltimore Sun

FOCUS | inriverretreats

In Focus, the only option is to sit at the desk and get some work done. The only distraction is the view out the window of the four season garden that changes daily. Focus is big enough for a chair at a desk, a door and a bookcase along the back wall. At 5’ x 9’, Focus is a compact little structure that can be tucked away in the far corner of the yard.

motivatedmontanan | hat tip MiniMotives

Candace says: Ultimately, my goal is to graduate from college nearly debt free, with a home of my own which is mortgage free that I can be proud of. My budget for this project is $10,000. In hopes of keeping my costs under control and organizing myself before I run to every hardware store in the state, I have made a detailed spreadsheet breaking down what I will need for each phase and its price. parts & price list